Upcoming Courses

The Effects of Marijuana in First Episode Psychosis

Emily Kline, PHD; Matcheri Keshavan, MD; Margaret Guyer, PHD

June 29, 2018 | Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 | Sherman Auditorium Register Now

Please join us for this 1-day course focusing on the impact of cannabis and substance use during the early course of psychotic disorders.

 

This course is designed so that participants will be able to:

  1. Develop an understanding of the impact of marijuana on early psychosis.

  2. Understand consumer and family perspectives on the impact of substance use and mental illness.

  3. Learn skills for talking to youth about harm reduction approaches to addressing substance use.

  4. Understand changes in cannabis legality in Massachusetts and their effects on youth at risk for serious mental illness.

  5. Discuss the management of treatment resistant psychosis.

Additional Information

8:45am – 9:00am Registration, Coffee, and Light Breakfast

9:00am – 9:05am Welcoming Remarks Emily Kline, PhD Project Director, MAPNET

9:05am – 9:20am FEP Treatment in Massachusetts and the Challenges Ahead
Margaret Guyer, PhD Director, DMH Early Psychosis Initiative

9:20am – 9:45am Roadblocks to Recovery Matcheri Keshavan, MD Stanley Cobb Professor of Psychiatry, BIDMC Senior Director, MAPNET

9:45am – 10:15am Changes in Cannabis Legality in Massachusetts
David Hoffman, MD Area Director, DMH

10:15am – 11:00am What we Know about Cannabis and Psychosis Deepak Dsouza, MD Director, Schizophrenia Neuropharmacology Research Group at Yale

11:00am – 11:15am Break

11:15am – 12:00pm Client and Family Member Perspectives Emily Kline, PhD Project Director, MAPNET

12:00pm – 1:00pm Lunch (on your own)

1:00pm – 1:45pm Harm Reduction Approaches to Addressing Substance Use with Young Adults Fred Crow, MD Medical Director, Young Adult Team, MMHC

1:45pm – 2:30pm Panel Discussion on Substance Use with Representatives from FEP Programs Kevin Hill, MD Director, Division of Addiction Psychiatry, BIDMC

2:30pm – 3:15pm Management of Treatment-Resistant Psychosis Oliver Freudenreich, MD Co-Director, MGH Schizophrenia Clinical and Research Program

3:15pm – 3:30pm Concluding Remarks Matcheri Keshavan, MD Stanley Cobb Professor of Psychiatry, BIDMC Senior Director, MAPNET

 

Continuing Education/Contact Hours: 5

Accreditation:

Psychologists: The Continuing Education Program at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical School, a major teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School, is approved by the American Psychological Association to offer continuing education for psychologists. The Continuing Education Program at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical School, a major teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School, maintains responsibility for this program and its content. This program offers 5 continuing education hours.

Counselors: The Continuing Education Program at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a major teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School, is an NBCC-Approved Continuing Education Provider (ACEPTM) and may offer NBCC-approved clock hours for events that meet NBCC requirements. The ACEP solely is responsible for all aspects of the program. This program meets the criteria for 5 clock hours.

Nurses: The Continuing Education Program at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a major teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School, meets the specifications of the Board of Registration in Nursing in Massachusetts.(244 CMR).

Social Workers: Application for social work continuing education credits has been submitted. Please contact us at jnova2@bidmc.harvard.edu or 617-754-1236 for the status of social work CE accreditation.

Faculty:

Matcheri S. Keshavan, MD
HMS Stanley Cobb Professor of Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, BIDMC

Dr. Keshavan is Stanley Cobb Professor and Vice Chair for Public Psychiatry at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), and has conducted early psychosis intervention and research for over two decades. He founded one of the first early psychosis clinical programs in the nation, services for treatment in early psychoses in Pittsburgh in 1990. He currently consults at the Prevention and Recovery in Early Psychosis (PREP®) service. He has published over 600 papers and 4 books on psychotic and related disorders including early psychosis neurobiology and intervention. He has organized educational conferences focused on early intervention in psychosis, biannually in Pittsburgh in Detroit and annually in Boston. He has been developing, efficacy-testing and implementing cognitive enhancement therapy (CET), listed as an evidence-based intervention for schizophrenia by SAMHSA in the early course of schizophrenia over the past decade and is currently running an RCT in this intervention at BIDMC/ MMHC. He edits the Elsevier journal Schizophrenia Research, and is on the editorial Board of several other journals, including the Journal of Early Intervention in Psychiatry.

 

Emily Kline, PhD
HMS Instructor of Psychology, Department of Psychiatry, BIDMC
Dr. Kline is an instructor of psychology in the department of
psychiatry at BIDMC and Harvard Medical School. She is a licensed psychologist trained in both child and adult intervention. She supervises trainees and directs outcomes
assessment and program evaluation for the PREP® clinic in Boston. She has published
over 30 peer reviewed papers related to early psychosis prediction, detection, triage, and
treatment, and has written several book chapters on best practices for early psychosis
assessment and intervention. She has developed a new assessment tool for tracking
engagement in first episode psychosis coordinated specialty care.

Margaret Guyer-Deason, PhD
Director, Massachusetts Department of Mental Health Early Psychosis
Initiative; Instructor in Psychology in the Department in Psychiatry, BIDMC
Dr. Guyer works as the Director of the Massachusetts Department of
Mental Health’s Early Psychosis Initiative. She is responsible for the identification,
evaluation, and dissemination of evidence based practices within the Department of Mental Health and among community providers. Dr. Guyer is a clinician and researcher who has worked with people with severe mental illness for more than 20 years.

David Hoffman, MD
Department of Mental Health Area Director
Dr. Hoffman is an experienced psychiatrist with expertise in serious
mental illness. He is currently the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health area
director for Metro Boston and as such has expertise in state mental health policy.

Deepak D’Souza, MBBS, MD
Professor of Psychiatry; Director Schizophrenia Neuropharmacology
Research Group at Yale (SNRGY); Director, Neurobiological Studies Unit, VACHS; Director, VA-CMHC Schizophrenia Research Clinic
Deepak Cyril D’Souza, MD is a staff psychiatrist at VA Connecticut
Healthcare System (VACHS) and Professor of Psychiatry, Yale University School of
Medicine. He is an active clinician, teacher and researcher, who has spent almost 25 years
within VACHS. As an active clinician and clinical administrator, he directs the
Neuropsychiatry Program at VACHS, the clinical service that cares for veterans with
psychotic, mood and personality disorders. He is actively involved in teaching residents,
fellows and other trainees, and directs the VA Schizophrenia Research Fellowship
program. He also mentors a number of junior faculty. He directs the Schizophrenia
Neuropharmacology Research Group at Yale (SNRGY) and the Neurobiological Studies
Unit. His research focus has been on the pathophysiology and treatment of psychotic
disorders, and cannabis dependence using a combination of psychopharmacological, brain
imaging and electrophysiological approaches. His research has been funded by the
National Institute of Drug Abuse, the National Institute of Mental Health, the National
Institute of Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse, VA R&D and several foundations. He is
recognized as a leading expert in the relationship between cannabinoids and psychosis.

Fred Crow, MD
Medical Director, Young Adult Team, MMHC
Dr. Crow is a clinical instructor in psychiatry at Harvard Medical
School. He has experience treating youth and young adults with and at risk for serious
mental illness. He is the medical director of Massachusetts Mental Health Center’s Young
Adult Team, which serves clients age 19-25 with serious mental illnesses.

Kevin Hill, M.D., M.H.S
Director of the Division of Addiction Psychiatry at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School
Dr. Hill graduated from Jefferson Medical College before training in
psychiatry at the Harvard Longwood Psychiatry Residency Training Program. He also
earned a Masters in Health Sciences from the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars
Program at Yale and also completed the Partners Healthcare Addiction Psychiatry
Fellowship Program. Dr. Hill’s clinical research is focused primarily on medications and
behavioral interventions that might improve available treatments for those wanting to stop
smoking marijuana. Dr. Hill was the recipient of a prestigious federal K99/R00 grant award from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) to test the efficacy of a synthetic
marijuana-like compound, nabilone, as a potential medication treatment for patients with
marijuana addiction. His work has been funded by NIDA, the Brain and Behavior Research Foundations, the American Lung Association, the Greater Boston Council on Alcoholism, and the Peter G. Dodge Foundation. He has received multiple competitive awards as an investigator and published on numerous topics in addiction. Over the past several years, Dr. Hill has been asked to weigh in on marijuana policy issues such as medical marijuana and legalization of marijuana. He is committed to bridging the gap between the science and the public perception about marijuana. He has spoken nationally and internationally to students from public and private schools, parents, healthcare professionals, and organizations about marijuana science, policy, and treatment, as well as alcohol and opioids.

Oliver Freudenreich, MD, FAPM
Co-Director, MGH Schizophrenia Clinical and Research Program
Dr. Oliver Freudenreich is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at
Harvard Medical School and a Psychiatrist at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). He
serves as co-director of the MGH Schizophrenia Clinical and Research Program and
directs the MGH Fellowship in Public and Community Psychiatry. His academic interest is
in the area of optimal psychopharmacological treatment for schizophrenia, including
clozapine for refractory psychosis, early course schizophrenia, the role of medical morbidity in schizophrenia, the integration of medicine and psychiatry, and treatment adherence. In addition to his clinical and clinical trial expertise in schizophrenia, Dr. Freudenreich provides psychiatric consultations for medically complex patients with serious mental illness or diagnostically difficult cases with psychosis. He is a deputy editor for the journal Psychosomatics. He has published extensively in his areas of interest and he wrote a handbook on psychotic disorders. Dr. Freudenreich is an active teacher who lectures regularly at national meetings and at his home institution. At MGH, he is the course director for the Department of Psychiatry’s monthly Morbidity and Mortality conference.